Donald's Fluence ZE range guidance. - Renault Z.E. Forum
 
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post #1 of 4 (permalink) Old 11-16-2013, 04:43 AM Thread Starter
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Donald's Fluence ZE range guidance.




Each 'octal' of the battery meter represents:
8 miles per octal for 'spirited' or constant high speed 70mph driving, getting ahead of the traffic flow
10 miles per octal for modest driving - nothing too fast nor slow, keeping up with the traffic flow
12 miles per octal for smug, gentle floaty-around driving, slightly falling behind the traffic flow
15 miles per octal is possible for ultra saintly hypermiling, definitely slowing up the traffic behind you

Modifiers:
-1 mile per octal for air con or gentle hearing
-2 miles per octal for full heating
-1 mile per octal when it is raining (I don't know why, but see for yourselves!!)
-0 miles per octal for electrical accessories (I mention that to show that it really doesn't seem to have a noticeable effect if you leave your lights and audio on)[hr]
Tips for high range:
- Don't use short bursts of high power followed by cruise, instead use a steady lower power and build up speed gradually.
- Avoid drawing more than 20kW at any time. If you find you can get by drawing a lower peak power on your regular routes, then do that. The highest ranges are possible if you keep your current draw to 12kW or less at any one time through the journey.
- It's always better to simply not build up speed than try to regenerate it later. You don't get that much back from regen.
- Try to avoid using brakes at all, back off early and allow the regen to slow you down. Once down to around 10mph press the brake pedal gently just enough to light the brake lights. This prevents the creep function cutting in and you can roll to a stop without any mechanical braking.
(If you manage to avoid using brakes very much at all then you may need to monitor the rear discs for corrosion. To clear, pull the handbrake gently, occasionally, while rolling or slowing to rub off the corrosion on the rear discs. It is a 'regular' actuated caliper and not a top-hat brake, so it should be OK to do once in a while, though the car does beep at you annoyingly when you do this!)
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post #2 of 4 (permalink) Old 11-17-2013, 06:53 AM
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RE: Donald's Fluence ZE range guidance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by donald



Each 'octal' of the battery meter represents:
8 miles per octal for 'spirited' or constant high speed 70mph driving, getting ahead of the traffic flow
10 miles per octal for modest driving - nothing too fast nor slow, keeping up with the traffic flow
12 miles per octal for smug, gentle floaty-around driving, slightly falling behind the traffic flow
15 miles per octal is possible for ultra saintly hypermiling, definitely slowing up the traffic behind you

Modifiers:
-1 mile per octal for air con or gentle hearing
-2 miles per octal for full heating
-1 mile per octal when it is raining (I don't know why, but see for yourselves!!)
-0 miles per octal for electrical accessories (I mention that to show that it really doesn't seem to have a noticeable effect if you leave your lights and audio on)[hr]
Tips for high range:
- Don't use short bursts of high power followed by cruise, instead use a steady lower power and build up speed gradually.
- Avoid drawing more than 20kW at any time. If you find you can get by drawing a lower peak power on your regular routes, then do that. The highest ranges are possible if you keep your current draw to 12kW or less at any one time through the journey.
- It's always better to simply not build up speed than try to regenerate it later. You don't get that much back from regen.
- Try to avoid using brakes at all, back off early and allow the regen to slow you down. Once down to around 10mph press the brake pedal gently just enough to light the brake lights. This prevents the creep function cutting in and you can roll to a stop without any mechanical braking.
(If you manage to avoid using brakes very much at all then you may need to monitor the rear discs for corrosion. To clear, pull the handbrake gently, occasionally, while rolling or slowing to rub off the corrosion on the rear discs. It is a 'regular' actuated caliper and not a top-hat brake, so it should be OK to do once in a while, though the car does beep at you annoyingly when you do this!)
Thanks Donald - I'm finding this really useful reading. Interesting to note that the lights and audio don't make any noticeable difference - I know they are run off the 12v battery but it still has to be charged I suppose. Heating is obviously the killer so I'll be using eco mode as much as possible. Not sure I'll ever get 15 mpo (is this the new standard acronym?) but can certainly try in the Summer...
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post #3 of 4 (permalink) Old 11-17-2013, 07:08 AM
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RE: Donald's Fluence ZE range guidance.

Thanks Donald - very interesting.

Do you have a view on how much of the loss of range in cold weather is down to increased use of heating, air-con, lights and so on, and how much is down to the impact of low temperatures on the batteries/drivetrain?
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post #4 of 4 (permalink) Old 11-24-2013, 05:22 AM Thread Starter
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RE: Donald's Fluence ZE range guidance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ElectricDave
Do you have a view on how much of the loss of range in cold weather is down to increased use of heating, air-con, lights and so on, and how much is down to the impact of low temperatures on the batteries/drivetrain?
I've been monitoring this, and as far as I can tell so far (not yet sub-zero all day around) there is no detectable difference on the battery performance, that I can tell.

Of course, unlike every (?) other EV, the Fluence benefits somewhat by having the battery in the boot. Often seen as a handicap, I like this arrangement because it is less exposed to thermal responses to the environment (whereas an underside battery pack has a very large surface area subjected to temp fluctuations). By being more 'internal' within the vehicle, the thermal inertial of the internal cabin after previous day's use, and then the heating effect from battery charging overnight, I suspect the battery cells experience significantly smaller thermal cycles than other evs.

(The other benefit is that there is more vertical space within the cabin, too. So the Fluence has one of the lowest body heights of EVs yet has the most headroom and plenty of foot space - bar the Kangoo, of course!(which, in point of fact, I'd prefer to the Fluence))



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